Thesis Details


Thesis Title: Evaluation of the fast system for its ability to measure fabric mechanical properties and their relation to fabric hand
Thesis Author: Kevin Thompson
Abstract: The hand or feel of a fabric is one of the most important factors influencing its acceptance. Historically, hand evaluation has been a subjective process. Judges would grasp fabrics in their hands and use various words to describe the way it feels. High variability and poor reproducibility of sUbjective assessment lead to the need for a system of objective measurement relating to hand. In the past twenty years much research work has been devoted to the development of objective methods which can measure fabric mechanical properties relating to hand. In 1972 Dr. Sueo Kawabata developed the Kawabata Evaluation System for Fabrics. This is considered the standard system for the measurement of fabric mechanical properties relating to hand. The cost of this system along with complicated testing procedures has limited the widespread use of this system. The FAST system is a system recently introduced for the measurement of fabric mechanical properties relating to hand. It is intended as a reliable, quick response system for control of fabric finishing and tailoring. This study compares the two systems on their ability to measure fabric mechanical properties related to hand. Thirty-five fabrics taken from a broad range of categories were tested on both systems and the results were analyzed through various forms of statistics. Results from one set of regression and canonical analyses indicated the two systems were highly related when comparing the similar mechanical properties tested. A separate set of regression and canonical analyses indicated that both systems had high correlations to a subjective evaluation of hand. Discriminant analyses were done on results from both systems to determine each system's ability to categorize the fabrics into broad categories. The KESF was able to group 100% of the fabrics into the correct category while the FAST system, which is relatively much more inexpensive, was able to categorize 89% of the fabrics into the correct category. Results from an analysis of variance indicated the FAST system was able to discern the difference between fabrics with subtle differences. This could indicate the system is a good tool for use in the Quality Control and Quality Assurance of fabrics. The results from this thesis indicated the FAST system is a viable tool for the objective measurement of fabric mechanical properties. Its relative cost and ability to give a quick ,assessment of a fabric's mechanical properties will aid in technical communication regarding fabric hand.